GET HELP NOW:(877) 310-9545DONATE TODAY

Study Backs Role of Faith-Based Addiction Treatment

Posted 
September 15, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

A recent study proved what many of you alfaith-based addiction treatmentready have come to know: faith-based addiction treatment works.

Researchers asked a small group of individuals with substance use disorders about various types of addiction treatment and how effective they were – and 92 percent favored programs with spiritual or religious guidance.

The study was spurred by a phone call three years ago between Eric Kocian, an assistant professor of criminology, law and society at St. Vincent College in Pennsylvania, and county detective Tony Marcocci. During this time, local officials were just starting to fight back against the heroin epidemic.

“This is one sample, this is one study,” Kocian said. “We'd like to replicate it.”

The Benefits of Spirituality as Part of Addiction Rehab
This certainly isn’t the first or last study to prove the benefits of faith-based addiction treatment. In fact, those who choose Christian rehab have been found to have a greater chance of getting and staying sober. Beyond fewer relapses, rehab treatment that includes a spiritual component can also help you or someone you love to:

  • Believe that recovery is possible
  • Ask for forgiveness and make amends
  • Learn to handle life’s emotional highs and lows
  • Improve anger management and emotional control
  • Navigate moral choices after rehab
  • Develop strength and resilience
  • Achieve a sense of family and community
  • Discover a higher life purpose
  • Gain a more positive life outlook

More About Christian Rehab
Making the decision to seek help for your own addiction, or helping a loved one to decide to seek help, may be the biggest and most important choice of your life. Let us lead the way. At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. You’ll learn to strengthen your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol. To learn more, call us today: 877-310-9545.

Helping Vs. Enabling: How to Tell the Difference

Posted 
September 8, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

enabling a loved oneThere’s a fine line between helping and enabling a loved one struggling with addiction. But how do you tell the difference? And how do you know when your “help” isn’t actually helping and may even be delaying treatment?

Let’s start by looking at the definitions:

  • To help someone means to do something for someone else that they are not capable of doing for themselves.
  • To enable someone, on the other hand, means to do something for someone else that they can and should be doing for themselves.

So “helping” by doing a loved one’s chores or completing his or her school or work obligations is really enabling him or her to shirk responsibilities in favor of pursing the addiction.

It’s perfectly natural to want to help your loved ones, whether a child, spouse or sibling. And even if your desire is well intentioned – you could be causing more harm than good. This is because picking up the pieces or pretending that everything is OK can prevent him or her from dealing with the consequences, getting help and getting well.

Here are a few more examples of “helpful” acts that are actually enabling your loved one:

  • You make excuses to his/her employer or teacher about why he didn’t show up or is always running late.
  • You pay bills or debts.
  • You cover up any acceptable behavior or make-up lies or excuses to others (even yourself).
  • You take on more to compensate for your loved one’s failure to meet responsibilities.
  • You bail out your loved one from disasters created due to active addiction.
  • You put your own needs aside to continually take care of your loved one.

Healing Families at Christian Rehab
If you or someone you care about is caught in the bondage of drugs or alcoholism, Christian Rehab Network can help. We help families to find faith-based drug rehab programs based in Biblical truth. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

Dispelling Addiction Myths and Stereotypes

Posted 
August 24, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

addiction myths

Facing your addiction and taking a giant leap to get help takes a lot of courage. Recovery is a tough journey and that’s without having to also deal with the many damaging rumors and stereotypes out there about addiction. By knowing the facts, you can have more confidence in your decision to get help. You’ll also be better equipped to educate any loved ones along the way.

Here we address some of the most common misconceptions (along with the truths) about addiction.

  • Myth #1: Addiction is a choice.
    While the decision to use alcohol or drugs is voluntary, people don’t choose to become addicted. Genetics play a major role along with such environmental factors as family life, upbringing and peer influences.
  • Myth #2: Addiction is caused by a lack of willpower.
    While willpower certainly can help prevent relapse, it can’t cause addiction. Nor will willpower alone help someone stop using. This is because prolonged use of addictive substances can change the structure of the brain, making it difficult to control impulses or focus on anything other than using drugs.
  • Myth #3: People who abuse drugs and alcohol are immoral and bad.
    Certainly, many people lie, cheat and steal during active addiction, but these behaviors are driven by changes in the brain brought on by a substance use disorder. Addiction is a sickness, not a character flaw.
  • Myth #4: Addiction is a man’s disease.
    In fact, women are among the fastest-growing segments of drug users in the U.S. – and more than 4 million women are in need of addiction treatment, according to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD).
  • Myth #5: Treatment won’t work unless it was your idea.
    According to research, people seek treatment for two reasons: they were persuaded by a loved one or court ordered to do so. And regardless of the reason they sought treatment in the first place, drug treatment programs produce successful outcomes for the majority of people suffering from addiction.

Is Christian Rehab Right for You?
Making the decision to seek help for your own addiction, or helping a loved one to decide to seek help, may be the biggest and most important choice of your life. Let us lead the way. To learn more about our Christian rehab, call today: 877-310-9545.

10 Inspirational Quotes for Recovery

Posted 
August 17, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

inspirational quotesAddiction recovery can feel overwhelming at times and we can all use a few encouraging words to remind us that we’re not alone and that recovery really is possible.

In fact, the perfect quotation can help lift your spirits and put you in a positive mindset for the long road ahead. Here are a few inspiring quotes we love – print out the ones that inspire you and tape them where you’ll be sure to see them.

  1. "Life is a journey. When we stop, things don't go right." – Pope Francis
  2. "Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.” – Mother Teresa
  3. “Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the little voice at the end of the day that says I'll try again tomorrow.” – Mary Anne Radmacher
  4. "Someday, everything will make perfect sense. So for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears, and keep reminding yourself that everything happens for a reason." – Unknown
  5. “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." – Theodore Roosevelt
  6. “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” – Maria Robinson
  7. “If you can’t fly, then run. If you can’t run, then walk. If you can’t walk, then crawl, but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward.” – Martin Luther King Jr.
  8. "Continuous effort  not strength nor intelligence  is the key to unlocking our potential." – Winston Churchill
  9. “When everything seems like an uphill struggle, just think of the view from the top.” – Unknown
  10. “Amazing how we can light tomorrow with today.” – Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Being Inspired By Faith
You’ll find that strength comes easily and your willpower is seemingly fortified by the presence of the Lord in your recovery process, and we are here to ensure you find a facility that leads you down his path and into sobriety for the rest of your life. To learn more about our addiction services, call today: 877-310-9545.

Why Being Physically Active Helps Your Recovery

Posted 
August 10, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

being physically active helps recoveryStaying physically active is one of the best things you can do for your mind and body – and it should also rank pretty high on your list of recovery to-dos. Here’s why:

  • You’ll fill a void. If you’re like most people in early recovery, you may find yourself with a lot of free time on your hands – time that you used to spend thinking about, getting, using, and recovering from drugs or alcohol. Exercise is a great activity to occupy several hours, especially if you factor in getting ready for and getting cleaned up after a workout.
  • You’ll increase confidence. Setting small, achievable exercise goals and meeting them can be a great confidence booster. And these little “wins” can give you the extra motivation you need to stick with your recovery and make lasting changes to your overall health.
  • You’ll improve focus. Years of addiction can take a toll on your brain and you may be struggling with a lack of focus or brain fog caused by withdrawal or even neuronal damage. A recent study showed that as little as 30 minutes of aerobic exercise (like walking) could increase a person’s performance on cognitive quizzes.
  • You’ll remain strong-willed. Being physically active will help you beat back any cravings and ease any withdrawal symptoms that could trigger relapse.
  • You’ll tame tension. Mind-body techniques like yoga, Pilates, and tai chi can help you to unwind, focus, and better deal with stress, which is a common relapse trigger.
  • You’ll be in a better mood. As exercise invigorates the heart and lungs, it stimulates the brain's reward pathway and heightens mood-boosting neurochemicals, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Building a Better You
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

5 Ways to Prevent Loneliness

Posted 
July 31, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

Some people call addiction “the loneliness disease.” This is prevent lonelinessbecause loneliness can trigger alcohol and drug use – and it can also be an emotion that sticks with you well into recovery. It’s more than just feeling alone, however, it’s feeling that no one understands or cares about you – even when your loved ones are supporting and cheering you on. While these feelings are normal, they are also dangerous to your physical, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing and your long-term sobriety.

Now, for the good news: Overcoming loneliness is possible. In addition to working with your addiction counselor or mental health professional, you can ease these feelings with the following steps:

  • Take time for silence. Find some place of silence so that you can read, pray, meditate, listen and allow God to help you overcome these feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Lean on friends and family. Strong social ties have been shown to help with recovery and your overall health, so carve out quality time with loved ones. This is also the perfect time to make amends, if possible, and reconnect with the people who have been deeply hurt by your addiction.
  • Join a support group. Meeting others within the recovery community – whether online or in-person – will help you build a network of support and remind you that you’re not alone in your struggles to stay sober.
  • Find a hobby. Discovering or rediscovering a passion is a great way to lift your spirits and combat any feelings of isolation. This is especially true if your chosen hobby gets you out and about and aligns you with like-minded people.
  • Get involved. Whether you decide to volunteer or become more active in your local church community, giving back to others is a surefire remedy for loneliness. It will help remind you that you’re not alone and bolster your confidence by proving that you can have a positive impact on others.

Your Christian Partner in Recovery
The founding principle of Christian Rehab Network is that you should never have to walk the journey toward sobriety alone. We’ll help you find your way back to the Lord and achieve a truly lasting recovery. To learn more, call: 877-310-9545.

Could Your Child Have Failure to Launch Syndrome?

Posted 
July 21, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

failure to launch syndromeFailure to launch syndrome, the term used to describe a young person’s inability to leave home and begin an independent lifestyle, is a growing epidemic.

In general, young adults with failure to launch will have trouble following through with opportunities and display an overall lack of goal setting. And, after failing to navigate college, they often find themselves out of sync with their peers and in constant conflict with their families.

A few more red flags:

  • Low levels of motivation
  • Inability to find or keep a job
  • Poor work ethic and inability to meet deadlines
  • Lack of vision for the future
  • Unwillingness to face responsibilities, such as paying bills or maintaining an apartment or home
  • Inability to manage chores or daily tasks
  • Inability to deal with stress or conflict
  • Poor decision-making skills
  • Low frustration threshold
  • Fear of taking chances

Co-Occurring Disorders to Watch Out For
Many teens and young adults with failure to launch syndrome also have problems with substance use disorders as well as mental health disorders, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Drug and Alcohol Abuse
  • Eating Disorders
  • Gaming or Internet Addiction
  • Learning/Attention problems
  • Mood Disorders
  • Personality Disorders

Not only do these severe mental health problems prevent a young adult from becoming independent and reaching their full potential, but also they become compounded with a co-occurring substance use disorder. And abusing drugs or alcohol certainly doesn’t help with lack of motivation, low self-esteem and an inability to cope with the life challenges inherent in an adult world.

Getting Help for Failure-to-Launch and Substance Abuse
Substance use and failure to launch can impact brain development in adolescents, disrupting social, emotional and intellectual functioning. Our Adolescent Christian Rehab can help your young adult develop the skills needed to live healthy and sober on his or her own. To learn more, call us today: 877-310-9545.

Could My Loved One Be a High-Functioning Alcoholic?

Posted 
July 7, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

high-functioning alcoholicJust because someone holds down a good job, attends church and community events or has what seems like a healthy family life, it doesn't mean he or she doesn’t have a problem with alcohol. So-called high-functioning alcoholics typically seem to have it all together on the outside – and may even hold high-power positions in the community and at work -- but inside they are suffering from the physical and emotional effects of alcohol. They may even be struggling with such hallmarks of addiction as uncontrollable cravings, unsuccessful attempts to quit drinking and obsessive thoughts about their next drink.

Despite their best efforts at concealment, they’ll likely exhibit some subtle and not-so-subtle signs uncharacteristic of their sober selves. Here are a few to watch out for:

  • Denial: Listen carefully for excuses. For example: “I haven’t had any setbacks because of drinking.” “I have a great job and pay my bills, so I can’t be an alcoholic.” “I only drink expensive wine.”
  • Eating habits: Many high-functioning alcoholics use mealtimes as an excuse to start drinking or lose interest in food altogether.
  • Withdrawal signs: This includes becoming irritable, nervous or uncomfortable when he or she is forced to abstain from drinking.
  • Lack of control: A high functioning alcoholic won’t be able to stop after just one or two drinks -- and will likely always have an excuse for just one more round.
  • Behavioral changes: For example, a mild manner person might act aggressive or a conservative individual impulsive while under the influence.

Christian Addiction Treatment For High-Functioning Alcoholics
Making the decision to seek help for your own addiction, or helping a loved one to decide to seek help for alcohol abuse, may be the biggest and most important choice of your life. Let us lead the way. To learn more about our Christian rehab, call today: 877-310-9545.

 Why Small Victories Count

Posted 
March 1, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

We don’t have to tell you that addiction recovery requires on-going work and that every little bit of extra motivation can help. In fact, this is exactly why even the smallest victory – breathing through a stressful moment, for instance – should be celebrated. Whether you’re new to recovery or have been living clean for years, every little recovery win helps to propel you forward and empower you to reach your lifelong goal of lasting sobriety.

Here are a few healthy and sober ways to celebrate your small recovery victories – whether you took a different route to avoid the liquor store or ordered water at the restaurant:

  • Keep a daily or monthly journal. This way you can track your progress and record your “wins.” Or, consider writing down your victories on index cards or small pieces of paper and storing them in a Mason jar or shoebox. This way you can revisit them for extra motivation.
  • Gather friends for a fancy dinner. Call the restaurant ahead of time to request the removal of the drink list or to ask the waist staff not to offer any alcoholic drinks to your party
  • Celebrate with Mother Nature. Spending time in nature is a great way to honor your recovery and the toxic parts of your life that you have eliminated. Take a long hike or arrange a pick-up game of flag football or Frisbee in the park with friends.
  • Share your story. Whether you begin a blog or simply update your Facebook status with a recent milestone, sharing your story can help you acknowledge your successes and help others in the recovery community come forward, too.
"but thanks be to God, who gives us victory through our Lord Jesus Christ."

1 Corinthians 15:57

Celebrating the New You
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

Leaving Your Past in the Past

Posted 
February 4, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

leaving pastDwelling on the past can be detrimental to your recovery. This is because it can prevent you from moving forward and giving yourself the self-love and self-encouragement you need to endure the hard work of rehab. While it's okay to learn from the past, you must also learn how to leave it behind and move toward a better, brighter, healthier future. These steps can help:

  • Make amends. Now isn’t the time to dwell on what you did to others but how to work toward repairing these relationships or making amends.
  • Seek support. If you find yourself having a hard time leaving the past in the past, talk with your pastor or addiction counselor or recovery peers.
  • Build goals. Having both short- and long-term goals will help point you in the right direction, so you’re moving toward the future and you’re not stuck in the past.
  • Practice gratitude. Having an attitude of gratitude also means feeling thankful about you -- about how far you’ve come, where you are now, and how you are bettering your life.  Being grateful can give you the fuel you need to move past the past.
  • Forgive yourself. Letting go of the past often starts with forgiving yourself – for past actions and behaviors. Do your best to encourage and forgive yourself. For example, tell yourself things like, “I’m taking steps to get better,” or “I made mistakes but I'm making amends.” And remember, recovery is your chance to start fresh and become the person you’ve always wanted to become.

Moving Forward Toward Sobriety
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

1 2 3 5
Christian Rehab Network
16371 Gothard St., Suite C
Huntington Beach CA 92647

Contact us today:
(877) 310-9545

© 2020 Christian Rehab Network
Top