GET HELP NOW:(877) 310-9545DONATE TODAY

5 Relapse Triggers to Avoid

Posted 
August 3, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

relapse triggersRelapse triggers are a very real part of addiction – but you can take steps to fight back. Your first step: Identify your personal triggers. Next, create a plan to take action so they don’t threaten your hard-won sobriety. Here are a few common triggers to watch out for:

1. HALT: Hunger, Anger, Loneliness, and Tiredness: This acronym was designed to remind you to stop and ask yourself: “Am I feeling hungry, angry, lonely, or tired?” When these basic needs aren’t met, you’re more likely to engage in self-destructive behaviors, including relapse.

2. Social isolation: Isolating yourself from friends, family, peers and professionals from the addiction community is a slippery slope into relapse. Now more than ever, it’s essential to have a solid support system in place.

3. Celebration: Not all triggers are negative. In fact, a positive event – like a job promotion or new apartment – can make you rationalize a celebratory drink, for instance. Take time to plan ahead and have a list of some sober ways to celebrate your successes.

4. Overconfidence: While self-confidence is an important part of your mental health and lasting sobriety, too much confidence can be dangerous to your recovery. It can lead you to mistakenly think you can handle a high-risk situation that could easily trigger a relapse. The trick is finding a healthy balance of confidence, cautiousness and humility

5. New relationships: Most addiction experts urge against romantic relationships within the first year of recovery. This is because it’s easy to develop an unhealthy dependence and to relapse should the relationship come to an end.

Aftercare for Lifetime Sobriety
Built on the same spiritual foundations as the inpatient facilities and detox services we offer, the use of outpatient drug and alcohol, mental health or other services can be used to help you develop relapse prevention strategies and build on the recovery you gained during rehab. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

5 Ways to Prevent Loneliness

Posted 
July 31, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

Some people call addiction “the loneliness disease.” This is prevent lonelinessbecause loneliness can trigger alcohol and drug use – and it can also be an emotion that sticks with you well into recovery. It’s more than just feeling alone, however, it’s feeling that no one understands or cares about you – even when your loved ones are supporting and cheering you on. While these feelings are normal, they are also dangerous to your physical, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing and your long-term sobriety.

Now, for the good news: Overcoming loneliness is possible. In addition to working with your addiction counselor or mental health professional, you can ease these feelings with the following steps:

  • Take time for silence. Find some place of silence so that you can read, pray, meditate, listen and allow God to help you overcome these feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Lean on friends and family. Strong social ties have been shown to help with recovery and your overall health, so carve out quality time with loved ones. This is also the perfect time to make amends, if possible, and reconnect with the people who have been deeply hurt by your addiction.
  • Join a support group. Meeting others within the recovery community – whether online or in-person – will help you build a network of support and remind you that you’re not alone in your struggles to stay sober.
  • Find a hobby. Discovering or rediscovering a passion is a great way to lift your spirits and combat any feelings of isolation. This is especially true if your chosen hobby gets you out and about and aligns you with like-minded people.
  • Get involved. Whether you decide to volunteer or become more active in your local church community, giving back to others is a surefire remedy for loneliness. It will help remind you that you’re not alone and bolster your confidence by proving that you can have a positive impact on others.

Your Christian Partner in Recovery
The founding principle of Christian Rehab Network is that you should never have to walk the journey toward sobriety alone. We’ll help you find your way back to the Lord and achieve a truly lasting recovery. To learn more, call: 877-310-9545.

Could Your Child Have Failure to Launch Syndrome?

Posted 
July 21, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

failure to launch syndromeFailure to launch syndrome, the term used to describe a young person’s inability to leave home and begin an independent lifestyle, is a growing epidemic.

In general, young adults with failure to launch will have trouble following through with opportunities and display an overall lack of goal setting. And, after failing to navigate college, they often find themselves out of sync with their peers and in constant conflict with their families.

A few more red flags:

  • Low levels of motivation
  • Inability to find or keep a job
  • Poor work ethic and inability to meet deadlines
  • Lack of vision for the future
  • Unwillingness to face responsibilities, such as paying bills or maintaining an apartment or home
  • Inability to manage chores or daily tasks
  • Inability to deal with stress or conflict
  • Poor decision-making skills
  • Low frustration threshold
  • Fear of taking chances

Co-Occurring Disorders to Watch Out For
Many teens and young adults with failure to launch syndrome also have problems with substance use disorders as well as mental health disorders, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Drug and Alcohol Abuse
  • Eating Disorders
  • Gaming or Internet Addiction
  • Learning/Attention problems
  • Mood Disorders
  • Personality Disorders

Not only do these severe mental health problems prevent a young adult from becoming independent and reaching their full potential, but also they become compounded with a co-occurring substance use disorder. And abusing drugs or alcohol certainly doesn’t help with lack of motivation, low self-esteem and an inability to cope with the life challenges inherent in an adult world.

Getting Help for Failure-to-Launch and Substance Abuse
Substance use and failure to launch can impact brain development in adolescents, disrupting social, emotional and intellectual functioning. Our Adolescent Christian Rehab can help your young adult develop the skills needed to live healthy and sober on his or her own. To learn more, call us today: 877-310-9545.

Talk to Your Kids About Prescription Drug Abuse

Posted 
July 13, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

The best thing you can do as a parent amid the current opioid crisis is to talk ttalking to teens about prescription drug abuseo your teen about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. In fact, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), kids who learn about the risks of drugs at home are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs than those who are not taught about the dangers. And still only 22 percent of teens report discussing abusing prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription with their parents, notes SAMHSA.

What's perhaps more alarming is that more teenagers die from taking prescription drugs than the use of cocaine and heroin combined. Opioid abuse can come with some devastating neurological and physical consequences, including:

  • Dependence
  • Slower brain activity
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Dangerously high body temperature
  • Heart failure
  • Lethal seizures
  • Risk of mental disorders like depression, anxiety or psychosis
  • Speech, vision, or hearing difficulties
  • Impaired cognition and motor skills
  • Poor emotional regulation
  • Inability to maintain relationships
  • Poor school work or job performance
  • Stunted emotional maturity

Prescription drug abuse also increases emergency room visits and suicide attempts. In 2009, more than 1 million emergency room visits involved the non-medical use of prescription drugs,  notes SAMHSA.

More Talking Points on Painkillers
Experts encourage parents to develop an ongoing dialogue with their children and to look for spontaneous, "teachable moments" to lay the groundwork for open, honest communication. Here are a few more tips to help your teen avoid opioid abuse.

  • Remind your teen that taking someone else’s prescription or sharing hers with others is illegal. Sixty four percent of teens say they have used prescription painkillers that they got from a friend or family member.
  • Encourage your teen to ask you or a doctor about the negative side effects of a prescribed medicine, how to watch for them, and what to do if a negative effect is suspected.
  • Ask your family physician to speak to your teen about the importance of proper use of prescription medicines.
  • Keep prescription medicines in a secure location, like a lock box, and get rid of old or unused medicine properly.
  • Monitor your teen’s use of the Internet, especially for any illegal online purchases.
  • Look for ways to get your child involved in sports, hobbies, school clubs, church and other activities that reduce boredom and excess free time.
  • Spend time together. Seek out activities that you and your child can do together.
  • Give your child lots of positive reinforcement so he has the confidence to stand up against peer pressure.

Christian Drug Addiction Treatment for Adolescents
At Christian Rehab Network, we offer a faith-based rehab for adolescents (ages 13 to 17). Our group and individual therapy, Bible study, pastoral care, and recreational recovery activities give adolescents age-appropriate strategies for coping with issues like depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, substance use disorders and social difficulties. To learn more, call 877-310-9545.

Could My Loved One Be a High-Functioning Alcoholic?

Posted 
July 7, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

high-functioning alcoholicJust because someone holds down a good job, attends church and community events or has what seems like a healthy family life, it doesn't mean he or she doesn’t have a problem with alcohol. So-called high-functioning alcoholics typically seem to have it all together on the outside – and may even hold high-power positions in the community and at work -- but inside they are suffering from the physical and emotional effects of alcohol. They may even be struggling with such hallmarks of addiction as uncontrollable cravings, unsuccessful attempts to quit drinking and obsessive thoughts about their next drink.

Despite their best efforts at concealment, they’ll likely exhibit some subtle and not-so-subtle signs uncharacteristic of their sober selves. Here are a few to watch out for:

  • Denial: Listen carefully for excuses. For example: “I haven’t had any setbacks because of drinking.” “I have a great job and pay my bills, so I can’t be an alcoholic.” “I only drink expensive wine.”
  • Eating habits: Many high-functioning alcoholics use mealtimes as an excuse to start drinking or lose interest in food altogether.
  • Withdrawal signs: This includes becoming irritable, nervous or uncomfortable when he or she is forced to abstain from drinking.
  • Lack of control: A high functioning alcoholic won’t be able to stop after just one or two drinks -- and will likely always have an excuse for just one more round.
  • Behavioral changes: For example, a mild manner person might act aggressive or a conservative individual impulsive while under the influence.

Christian Addiction Treatment For High-Functioning Alcoholics
Making the decision to seek help for your own addiction, or helping a loved one to decide to seek help for alcohol abuse, may be the biggest and most important choice of your life. Let us lead the way. To learn more about our Christian rehab, call today: 877-310-9545.

 Why Small Victories Count

Posted 
March 1, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

We don’t have to tell you that addiction recovery requires on-going work and that every little bit of extra motivation can help. In fact, this is exactly why even the smallest victory – breathing through a stressful moment, for instance – should be celebrated. Whether you’re new to recovery or have been living clean for years, every little recovery win helps to propel you forward and empower you to reach your lifelong goal of lasting sobriety.

Here are a few healthy and sober ways to celebrate your small recovery victories – whether you took a different route to avoid the liquor store or ordered water at the restaurant:

  • Keep a daily or monthly journal. This way you can track your progress and record your “wins.” Or, consider writing down your victories on index cards or small pieces of paper and storing them in a Mason jar or shoebox. This way you can revisit them for extra motivation.
  • Gather friends for a fancy dinner. Call the restaurant ahead of time to request the removal of the drink list or to ask the waist staff not to offer any alcoholic drinks to your party
  • Celebrate with Mother Nature. Spending time in nature is a great way to honor your recovery and the toxic parts of your life that you have eliminated. Take a long hike or arrange a pick-up game of flag football or Frisbee in the park with friends.
  • Share your story. Whether you begin a blog or simply update your Facebook status with a recent milestone, sharing your story can help you acknowledge your successes and help others in the recovery community come forward, too.
"but thanks be to God, who gives us victory through our Lord Jesus Christ."

1 Corinthians 15:57

Celebrating the New You
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

How to Give Back in Recovery

Posted 
February 17, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

giving backGiving back is a perfect way to kickoff the holiday season and it’s great for your recovery, too.  For one, it simply feels good to give. Beyond that, acts of altruism have been linked with lower levels of depression, greater positivity, increased confidence and self-worth and better overall life satisfaction.

Depending on how you choose to be charitable, it may also help you to meet new like-minded people and gain new skills and a sense of accomplishment. Plus, it feeds the soul and spirit.

Ready to get back as much (if not more) than you give? In the spirit of the upcoming holidays, here are few ways to give back during recovery:

  • Become an advocate for recovery. You can become an advocate of alcohol and/or drug addiction recovery by simply sharing your story. This is a great service to help reduce the stigma of addiction and its treatment, to encourage someone who is struggling and to strengthen your own sobriety. When you do meaningful work, you have more to lose and less reason to relapse.
  • Volunteer in the local community. Many addiction specialists consider volunteering a cornerstone of recovery. Find out if your local church has any volunteer initiatives, like soup kitchens or clothes drive, that need an extra hand this season.
  • Work with pets. If you’re not yet secure around others, volunteering with animals can be a good fit. Working with pets is both a learning experience and a healing experience for people in recovery. Check with your local animal shelter about any volunteer opportunities.

Continual Growth at Christian Rehab
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you explore your own recovery journey while learning to heal relationships and build a sober social network. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

Leaving Your Past in the Past

Posted 
February 4, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

leaving pastDwelling on the past can be detrimental to your recovery. This is because it can prevent you from moving forward and giving yourself the self-love and self-encouragement you need to endure the hard work of rehab. While it's okay to learn from the past, you must also learn how to leave it behind and move toward a better, brighter, healthier future. These steps can help:

  • Make amends. Now isn’t the time to dwell on what you did to others but how to work toward repairing these relationships or making amends.
  • Seek support. If you find yourself having a hard time leaving the past in the past, talk with your pastor or addiction counselor or recovery peers.
  • Build goals. Having both short- and long-term goals will help point you in the right direction, so you’re moving toward the future and you’re not stuck in the past.
  • Practice gratitude. Having an attitude of gratitude also means feeling thankful about you -- about how far you’ve come, where you are now, and how you are bettering your life.  Being grateful can give you the fuel you need to move past the past.
  • Forgive yourself. Letting go of the past often starts with forgiving yourself – for past actions and behaviors. Do your best to encourage and forgive yourself. For example, tell yourself things like, “I’m taking steps to get better,” or “I made mistakes but I'm making amends.” And remember, recovery is your chance to start fresh and become the person you’ve always wanted to become.

Moving Forward Toward Sobriety
At Christian Rehab Network, we can help you learn valuable life skills to build a fulfilling life of sobriety and reduce your risk of relapse. If you are searching for help strengthening your relationship with Christ while overcoming an addiction to drugs or alcohol, call today: 877-310-9545.

Encouraging Self-Esteem in Loved Ones

Posted 
January 21, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

Self-esteem plays a big part in your loved oneself-esteem’s recovery. After all, high self-esteem will help your loved one to:

  • Act independently and responsibly
  • Take pride in his/her accomplishments
  • Attempt new tasks and challenges
  • Better handle positive and negative emotions
  • And more...

Conversely, low self-esteem can prevent your loved one from working toward personal recovery goals and can even lead to relapse, if your loved one feels so badly about himself that he gives up and starts drinking or drugging again.

You can play a positive part in helping your loved one build or rebuild his or her self-esteem. Here are some suggestions to keep in mind:

  • Exercise with your loved one. Whether you go for a morning walk together or sign up for a yoga class, this will help encourage self-care, which is key to self-esteem.
  • Help your loved one find a hobby. Whether writing a poem, playing a musical instrument, or going for a hike, identifying an enjoyable hobby/activity is the perfect way to help your loved one feel more confident and happy.
  • Laugh with your loved one and encourage him to laugh at himself. People who take themselves very seriously are undoubtedly decreasing their enjoyment in life. A good sense of humor and the ability to make light of life are important ingredients for handling the ups and downs of sobriety.
  • Remind him that mistakes are okay. Especially when you go outside your comfort zone, you’re bound to stumble along the way.

Healing Families at Christian Rehab
If you or someone you care about is caught in the bondage of drugs or alcoholism, Christian Rehab Network can help. We help families to find faith-based drug rehab programs based in Biblical truth. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

Tips to Prevent Relapse

Posted 
January 6, 2020
 by 
Christian Rehab Network
 & filed under 

prevent relapseExperiencing a relapse – or even multiple relapses – during recovery is pretty common, but it’s not inevitable. In fact, long before the first drink or drug use occurs, there are typically warning signs.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), when people who have had a stable recovery and have done well begin to relapse they may experience the following:

  • Anxiety
  • Nervousness
  • Forgetfulness
  • Inability to experience pleasure
  • Lack of motivation
  • Feeling slowed down or speeded up
  • Being uncaring
  • Avoiding others or isolating
  • Being obsessed with something that doesn’t really matter
  • Displaying of irrational thought patterns
  • Feeling unconnected to your body
  • Increased irritability
  • Increased negativity
  • Not keeping appointments
  • Changes in appetite
  • Restlessness

It goes without saying, then, that a smart relapse prevention plan should include your individual warning signs as well as your personal triggers. Many addiction experts recommend keeping a running list – and refining it as you progress in your recovery. If this isn’t your first slip, you may even want to go a step further and ask your family, friends, pastor and/or counselor what signs they’ve noticed in you prior to your relapse.

In addition, the SAMHSA recommends taking action with one of these tips to prevent a relapse:

  • Reach out to a counselor, pastor or sober friends or family members.
  • Remove yourself from the situation and take a walk around the block a few times.
  • Distract yourself with a healthy snack or a book or movie.
  • Ask your friends and family to stop you if you begin talking about the fun you had while drinking or using.
  • Make a list of the good things about your new life: better relationships, more success at work or school, healthier appearance, more hobbies, etc.
  • If you have already relapsed at least once, think of how it happened. What can you do differently this time? “Just be strong and say no” is not enough to handle the situations you will face, notes SAMHSA.

Aftercare for Lifetime Sobriety
Built on the same spiritual foundations as the inpatient facilities and detox services we offer, the use of outpatient drug and alcohol, mental health or other services can be used to help you develop relapse prevention strategies and build on the recovery you gained during rehab. To learn more, call today: 877-310-9545.

Christian Rehab Network
16371 Gothard St., Suite C
Huntington Beach CA 92647

Contact us today:
(877) 310-9545

© 2020 Christian Rehab Network
Top